“No SARA institution is exempt from meeting the necessary sara standards because of its size, prestige, wealth, political influence, accreditation, religious affiliation, or sector (public, independent, public utility, self-profit),” Hill wrote. It added that SARA does not mechanize the power of the Attorney General of a member state “to investigate and deal with fraud, misrepresentation or abuse committed by an institution, including SARA institutions inside or outside the state.” Each stage of SARA`s development required a lot of conversation and debate. Those involved came from different backgrounds, including national regulatory authorities, university executive agents (SHEEOs), accreditation bodies, regional pacts for higher education and institutional frameworks representing all sectors of higher education. While SARA is certainly not a federal initiative, we appreciate the opportunities we had to consult with U.S. leaders. Ministry of Education during the development of SARA. Hill strongly disputed this characterization of SARA. In a blog post written in response to the “Failing U” report, Hill said sara was not criticized for “a race down” to set standards that were “too high, not too low.” He added that there is no benefit to an institution that wants to set up in states where regulation is weak “because sara rules are uniform throughout the country.” Asked how he responded to concerns that SARA facilitates for-profit institutions with bad practices, to grow and attract more students, Hill said that in the quarterly reports he receives, “there is no evidence of widespread misconduct.” He added: “I think it`s fair to say that 48 states wouldn`t have joined SARA if they thought sara would lead to this situation for their states.” For more information on SARA and the current list of participating States and institutions, see www.nc-sara.org. Peter McPherson, President of APLU, was Vice-President of the National Council for SARA (NC-SARA) and Paul Lingenfelter, former Chairman of the State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO), was Chairman of the Board of Directors of NC-SARA and played a central role in the development of the Regulatory Commission for Distance Post-Union Education, which provided the framework for the current reciprocity system. The Commission, that of the former United States.

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