When a lease is awarded to more than one person, the tenants jointly own the lease agreement and are “jointly and severally liable” after the contract. Our recommendation? Be effective in all respects. If you make screening reports, you require the under-door to pay for their own before renting. Reserve the right to refuse a sub-letter at your discretion (check state law for such a directive to be limited). Specify that the original tenant remains jointly and severally liable for rent, damages or other obligations. And set clear assignments for the deposit (will the original deposit be returned and replaced? Do you need an additional deposit?). With effect from June 1, 2019, it is prohibited for certain private landlords and rental agents to charge a tenant or other “relevant person” a rental deposit greater than the following:[8] If a deposit is required for a tenant for whom “several tenants” share responsibility, the surety is responsible for the tenant they have guaranteed and ALL their responsibilities for their share of the lease. If the tenant is jointly and severally liable, it is also his surety, unless the guarantee signed by the guarantor says otherwise. In some circumstances, this can be avoided by limiting your guarantor`s liability to a certain amount of money, such as your share of the rent.

If you have a joint tenancy agreement, you are responsible for the rent, both collectively and individually. This means that either of you can be held responsible for the entire rent. It is not possible to say that each tenant is responsible for his or her own determined share. Joint liability is incurred when two or more tenants (T1 and T2) promise together to another (the owner (L) to do the same. As a result, there is only one promise. For example, if T1 and T2 together promise to pay £100 to L, while both are equally responsible as L receives the entire £100, the promise can be kept by paying either T1 or T2 £100. Since joint liability gives rise to a single undertaking, in the past, in the event of delay, all the promisers, each a defendant in the same proceedings, had to be sued. But this is no longer the case and L can choose to act against T1 or T2 or both. In most joint lease agreements, tenants are jointly and severally liable for the payment of rent, expressly subject to other provisions of the agreement. For example, L T1 and T2 award a joint lease at a rent of £1,000 per month.

T1 and T2 agree that they each pay £500 to L. . .