Beauty pageants became increasingly popular in the 1880s. In 1888, the title of “Beauty Queen” was awarded to an 18-year-old Creole participant during a procession in Spa, Belgium. All participants had to provide a photo and a brief description of themselves to be eligible, and a final selection of 21 was evaluated by a formal jury. [22] Such events were not considered respectable. Some examples of beauty queen selection criteria, unique for some cultures, are Indian history and traditional craft skills at the Miss Indian American pageant,[101] Indian Dress Section at the Miss India USA pageant,[102] and the principles of “black beauty” accepted in the Miss Howard University pageant. [103] The winner is often seen as a role model for the “ideal” member of the community. [104] Competitions allow participants to learn how to present themselves in public and to cultivate certain qualities such as self-confidence or serenity. [105] In some cases, competitors are chosen to act as representatives on behalf of the Community. In Howard University`s African-American community, Miss Howard`s chosen university served as an advocate for the civil rights movement in the decades following the 1960s. [103] In addition, poor competition in Angola for mines allows victims to serve as spokespersons for other victims of mining accidents.

[106] A beauty contest was held during the 1839 Eglinton Tournament organized by Archibald Montgomerie, 13th Earl of Eglinton, as part of a re-enactment of a medieval tournament in Scotland. . . .